Controversy & Discussion

Last year, a new comic book came out under AHOY comics, called the Second Coming. This comic is about a Superman-esque hero being the roommate of Jesus during his second coming on Earth. At first this comic was supposed to be published by DC under its Vertigo label, but due to public outcry, they cancelled the book, only to be taken up by AHOY. In the first issue, Mark Russel, the writer of the book, also published an author’s note (linked below) explaining himself on why he wanted to create this book.

Within the note he discusses how people called him a blasphemer, which “is coming up with your own opinion” in his mind, so he accepted it whole heartedly. I encourage you to go to the link and read it for yourselves, but I was taken in by what he had to say. He sees the second half of the New Testament as a discussion from multiple people trying to come up with, and ultimately falling short of coming up “with a consensus about what Christ wanted of them, and implying that an open discussion faith should never be out of the question.

In not too many words, Russel’s note boils down to writing this comic to show the things he feels Christ would be appalled with, as they were some of the very things that he criticized in his life, his goal was to “refuse to play the reindeer games of the rich and powerful”. Which ultimately is what superhero stories are talking about, and why he paired Jesus with one. The main difference being, superheroes turn to violence to solve these things, while Christ is there to show that the world can be fixed without punishment and violence, but instead through empathy and forgiveness. In modern times more than ever, military force and the old ways are not going to be able to protect us, we must look to different ways, ways Christ represented, to solve our problems.

We need to practice these Christ-like ways of love, forgiveness, and empathy, now more that ever. “For without them, the world is lost.”

https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/heat-vision/second-coming-writer-explains-origins-controversial-comic-book-1223196

Sam Jacobs

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